Sorting things out

Well first of all we now have decent wifi. You will know that, when all else fails, I attempt to get on line by will power alone. Given how far away New Zealand is, I’ve only had limited success. But all is now well – not fast but at least consistent.

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I’m doing my best with the meeting – somewhat defeated by the amount of reading. But the main thing is probably the networking. There are about 80 people here – every corner of the earth – so it becomes important and possible to attempt to have a significant contact with every single one of them. Ultimately the Anglican Communion is built on relationships. So this kind of gathering is really important.

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So here I am with Bishop Mwita Akiri of the Diocese of Tarime in the Church of Tanzania. He was very keen to tell me about support which he has received from the Scottish Episcopal Church for building projects in his diocese

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And this is Rev Lynda Patterson who is the Acting Dean of the Cathedral in Christchurch – we had a talk about the issues around the future of the Cathedral after the earthquake. You can read some about it here She comes from Northern Ireland … and is a lurker on this blog.

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3 Responses to Sorting things out

  1. Ann Fontaine says:

    Any thoughts on the report on the Covenant adoption process? Seemed a bit fanciful. Did you receive a copy of the report? Does not seem to be available on the ACC 15 site.

    Thanks

    • david says:

      I think the message is that it is very much ‘work in progress’. For myself I am glad to see significant work on a review and possible revision of the Instruments of Communion and I think that the way forward may lie on that route. We need to ask ‘What kind of Communion are we – and what kind of Communion are we called to be?’. The logical question which follows is ‘what kind of structures, processes and instruments do we need to enable us to cohere while being definitively Anglican in culture and ethos?’

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