Constantine and all that

It’s good to be home again.  I did some catching up on my sleep during The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie at Pitlochry Theatre on Thursday evening.  It was very good. I’d forgotten how dark it is – the play of course – tho’ dark theatres are good for a quiet snooze.  I’m grounded now until the New Year.

So, after the opulence of the Scandinavian Churches, it’s back to the rather more threadbare charms of the Scottish Episcopal Church.  And of course, while it’s good to see how the other half live, I firmly believe that churches are healthier when they are disconnected from the state – and when they are lean and hungry.  No problem with the SEC in that department at the moment!

Talking about disconnection …. I ran an eye over the reports of the SNP Conference in the Sundays.  The release of the Lockerbie bomber loomed large, of course.  Certainly no other action by the Scottish Government has had similar international impact.  So had they noticed that the Scottish Churches had weighed in in support of their actions?  Not at all.  Gandhi – yes.  Scottish Episcopal and Church of Scotland – no.  That’s a secular society for you.

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3 Responses to Constantine and all that

  1. chris says:

    I was surprised by the vehemence of Salmond’s detractors as reported – how dare he make the comparison etc. Was it not a perfectly reasonable point of view?

  2. Anne T says:

    Your post makes me ponder the question, ‘what form of communication does the post-Constantinian Church need to develop in order to engage in that dialogue – and be heard?’ (One more akin to the creative language heard – or snoozed through! – in the theatre perhaps?)

  3. “I firmly believe that churches are healthier when they are disconnected from the state – and when they are lean and hungry.”

    As I do, Bishop David. Our church has only ever been lean and hungry, and, although it’s a constant struggle to make ends meet, I truly believe that we are the better for it. That would be St. John’s Episcopal Church in Thibodaux, Louisiana. See how far your reach stretches!

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